FOUR MEALS A DAY

Cooks on older Puget Sound tugboats prepared food for the crew, who ate before and after standing watch.  With four watches a day, cooks sometimes served meals at six AM, noon, six PM, and midnight.

Cooks also contended with their kitchen or “galley” constantly moving while they chopped, fried, and served.  Good tugboat cooks handled these challenging conditions gracefully, turning out hearty meals and even baking.  Bad tugboat cooks typically quit after only a few trips.

The Arthur Foss’s cooks used the diesel stove here, similar to those on other ships and boats.  The stove drew diesel from the engine’s fuel tanks to a large burner that heated the entire stove top – and the galley with it.  Since the stove could take several hours to heat, it ran constantly, allowing the cook to make hot meals day or night.

FOUR MEALS A DAY ; A WORKING BRIDGE ; THE ENGINE ROOM